Tag Archives: google

  • Sysadmins, Check Out Google’s Data Center Papers

    Screen Shot 2015-08-19 at 10.02.15 AM

    If you’re an enterprise architect or systems administrator, you know how a data center works—and if your career spans several years, chances are good that you’ve dealt with some pretty massive systems. But it’s hard to think of infrastructure more massive than what Google just revealed.

    “From relatively humble beginnings, and after a misstep or two, we’ve built and deployed five generations of datacenter network infrastructure,” Amin Vahdat, a Google Fellow, wrote in an Aug. 18 posting on the Google Research Blog. “Our latest-generation Jupiter network has improved capacity by more than 100x relative to our first generation network, delivering more than 1 petabit/sec of total bisection bandwidth.” That means 100,000 servers communicating “with one another in an arbitrary pattern at 10Gb/s.”

    Google built the system out of necessity; traditional networking hardware simply couldn’t scale to meet its enormous needs. The company has released four papers on how it managed to customize bandwidth to serve thousands of applications, design data center network topologies, deal with epic congestion and latency, and build a muscular cluster manager. For any tech pro interested in data centers, they’re well worth reading for an idea of how far networking and server technology has progressed—even if you have no intention of working with a system as large as Google’s.

    The post Sysadmins, Check Out Google’s Data Center Papers appeared first on Dice Insights.

  • Google’s Latest Shot in the Online Storage Wars

    shutterstock_Natig Aghayev

    Google believes that no company can afford to destroy any of its data. And while the price of storage has crumbled in recent years, companies can still find it expensive to retain massive amounts of data over the long term, especially when you throw in the costs and infrastructure associated with analyzing it.

    In its bid to compete with Amazon, which offers archival storage in the cloud via its “Glacier” service, Google has introduced Cloud Storage Nearline, a long-term storage hub that (it claims) can surface large amounts of data relatively quickly. (“Nearline enables ~3 second response times for data retrieval and improves SLAs,” suggests Google’s blog posting on the matter.) Capacity pricing is pegged at 1 cent per GB at rest.

    Check out the latest storage-related jobs.

    While those response times might not work for companies that need to retrieve a ton of data and quickly analyze it, Nearline could nonetheless assist those firms that need to store documents or relatively static items, and don’t necessarily want to do so via on-premises hardware.

    Iron Mountain, NetApp, and some other cloud-storage platforms will support Nearline. Given the long-running war over online storage, it’s almost certain that Google’s move will spark some sort of response from Amazon, Microsoft, and other big players in the space. That can only benefit those companies and developers for whom cheap long-term storage is important.

    Related Articles

    Upload Your ResumeEmployers want candidates like you. Upload your resume. Show them you’re awesome.

    Image: Natig Aghayev/Shutterstock.com

    The post Google’s Latest Shot in the Online Storage Wars appeared first on Dice News.

  • In Silicon Valley, Some Giants Are Hiring

    shutterstock_176341079

    What’s New This Quarter

    In Silicon Valley, everyone wants to be associated with the Next Big Thing. “In the Bay Area, I’m finding that SAAS and e-commerce based companies seem to be defining the current hiring status quo for other local companies and industries,” said Alyssa Seidman, Recruiting Director for recruiting firm Randstad Technologies. “They tend to have the most progressive environments and the ability to attract and afford the best talent.” That means companies in other industries, such as financial services and healthcare, need to get more creative if they want to compete for talent.

    And some financial-services companies are very much on the hunt for tech pros. Bank of New York Mellon has opened a technology lab in Palo Alto to work on tech projects including Digital Pulse, the bank’s effort to harness the Big Data it gathers. BNY Mellon hired 20 people by the end of 2014 and will increase recruitment in 2015.

    For more Silicon Valley jobs, click here.

    On the tech-company side of things, hiring in the Valley is at a high for some firms. Google never has a problem attracting talent. The search-engine giant continues on a hiring-and-building tear, spending $585 million to buy six office buildings at Pacific Shores Center in Redwood City. It also plans to occupy all of Moffett Place, a six-tower development in Sunnyvale. Google had 55,030 full-time employees at the beginning of the fourth quarter, up almost 19 percent from a year earlier; it gets three million job applications a year and hires around 7,000. With only one in 428 applicants ending up with a job, Google is far choosier than any Ivy League University.

    Dell is on a similar path, opening up its first Internet of Things Lab, a collaborative facility for hardware and software developers to build, test, and release connected products. Located at the company’s Santa Clara office, the lab should help Dell learn more about the industry and help develop standards around it.

    Meanwhile, three Silicon Valley giants have been undergoing huge transformations in the past few months:

    • In October, HP announced it will separate into two new publicly traded Fortune 50 companies: one comprising HP’s enterprise technology infrastructure, software and services businesses (called Hewlett-Packard Enterprise), and one that will comprise HP’s personal systems and printing businesses (HP Inc). The long-rumored announcement came as HP entered the fourth year of its five-year turnaround plan. While the company said it had “inspired its workforce and management teams” and created new companies “positioned to accelerate performance, drive sustained growth, and demonstrate clear industry leadership in key areas,” what was left unsaid was the final impact on headcount.
    • eBay is also changing, with plans to eliminate thousands of jobs early this year as it preps to spin off its PayPal unit. The cuts are expected to affect workers in eBay’s core marketplace division. One rumor has eBay has trimming at least 3,000 jobs. The end result could be to make the new standalone eBay a potentially attractive takeover target.
    • IBM is taking the divestment route, selling is global commercial semiconductor technology unit for $1.5 billion to Santa Clara-based Globalfoundries Inc. IBM has about 4,000 employees in Silicon Valley, and their futures are uncertain.

    Luckily, startups continue to do well. October was the hottest month in two years for angel, seed, and Series A funding of startups, according to a report from research firm CB Insights. More than $1.2 billion was invested in October, up 56 percent from October 2013. Silicon Valley accounted for about a third of the deals and more than half the dollars invested nationwide in the month, with eight of the top 10 fundings all happening in the Valley.

    Skills in Demand

    “Over the past six months, I’ve noticed an increase in demand for individuals that have UI development experience,” Randstad’s Seidman said. “Specifically, candidates that have experience with newer front end technologies like Node.JS, Angular.JS, and Python are in the highest demand. They’re more efficient and easier-to-scale than older technologies.”

    “The Bay Area is experiencing intense IT hiring due to continued software platform upgrades, virtualization projects, and mobile initiatives,” added Megan Slabinski, Bay Area district president of IT recruiting firm Robert Half Technology. “We continue to see a war for talent for in-demand roles including front end developers, data analysts, system administrators, and system architects.”

    According to IT recruiting firm Mondo’s 2014-2015 Salary Guide, the top three skills currently in demand in the Bay Area are Application and Software Development, E-commerce, and Database Administration.

    Sixty-one percent of Bay Area technology executives surveyed by Robert Half Technology said that both database management and desktop support are among the skill sets in greatest demand within their IT departments. Network administration followed in third place. Also in demand: Network Architects, Cloud Engineers, MongoDB Experts, and Hadoop Experts.

    Salary Trends

    According to the 2014-2013 Dice Salary Survey, the average salary for a Silicon Valley-based IT professional is the nation’s highest at $108,603, up 7.2 percent in the previous year and 23.6 percent above the national average of $87,811.

    According to Mondo, Data Scientists; Oracle, Hadoop, and Neteeza developers; AWS consultants; and MySQL developers are currently seeing the largest salary jumps.

    Leading Industries

    • Information Technology
    • Technology Manufacturing
    • Software Development
    • Construction
    • Defense/Aerospace

    Local Employment and Research Resources

    Upload Your ResumeEmployers want candidates like you. Upload your resume. Show them you’re awesome.

    Related Articles

    Image: Callahan/Shutterstock.com

    The post In Silicon Valley, Some Giants Are Hiring appeared first on Dice News.

  • Amazon’s Echo Enters Digital-Assistant Fight

    Amazon Echo

    Imagine a device in your home that passively listens to everything you say. In past decades, you might have called such a device a “bug,” and it was probably installed without your knowledge.

    But in the brave new world of 2014, this device is called Amazon Echo, and it’s apparently here to help.

    Click here to find mobile-development jobs.

    Echo is a black cylinder that can go pretty much anywhere in a house or apartment, and responds to a variety of queries. You can ask it about the weather, or a trivia question, and receive a reply; you can tell it to add items to a shopping list, and it does so; you can order it to play music, which the built-in speaker will blast at appropriate volume. The device is plugged in; an accompanying app for smartphones will allow users to manage shopping lists, music, alarms, and more through a specialized dashboard.

    “Echo’s brain is in the cloud, running on Amazon Web Services so it continually learns and adds more functionality over time,” reads Amazon’s copy on the product. “The more you use Echo, the more it adapts to your speech patterns, vocabulary, and personal preferences.”

    The consumer-tech world has been down this road before, of course. Apple’s Siri digital assistant responds to vocal commands; Google Now will answer spoken queries. The companies building these cloud-based, voice-activated platforms claim the software becomes more sophisticated as users make more queries. But voice has yet to catch on as a default means of input. In late 2013, for example, one poll suggested that 85 percent of those who owned an iOS device had never used Siri.

    Upload Your ResumeEmployers want candidates like you. Upload your resume. Show them you’re awesome.

    For Amazon fans and customers, the appearance of Echo on the heels of the Fire Phone’s high-profile failure might lead to concerns that the company is spreading itself too thin. Amazon dominates the online-retail market, and Amazon Web Services (AWS) powers many a company’s cloud, but that’s evidently not enough for CEO Jeff Bezos: He seems to want to rule the device market, as well. But while Amazon’s Kindle e-readers and Fire tablets drew users, Amazon had to take a massive write-down on the Fire Phone.

    Echo isn’t a bet-the-company initiative, but if it fails to gain marketplace traction, it could increase the calls for Amazon to focus on what it does best.

    Related Articles

    Image: Amazon

    The post Amazon’s Echo Enters Digital-Assistant Fight appeared first on Dice News.

  • Larry Page Thinks You’ll Only Work Part-Time for Our Robot Overlords

    Google co-founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin rarely sit down together for a joint interview, but venture capitalist Vinod Khosla managed to get them both onstage for nearly an hour last week. It was not an occasion for small ideas, with the pair discussing everything from healthcare and search to machine learning and the need for companies to tackle massive problems. (A complete transcript is available, as is video .) In contrast with most other tech companies, which choose to focus on a few core products, Google remains unafraid to spend resources on multiple avenues of research, even if that opens the firm up to accusations that its operations are spread too thin. During the interview, Page suggested that Google knows its limits, and that many of its diverse products eventually end up integrated in some fashion. “I think it sounds stupid if you have this big company, and you can only do five things,” he said. “I think it’s also not very good for the employees.” Click here for Google-related jobs. Page believes that technology has the ability to radically change society’s current structure, as it’s reduced the work and resources necessary to provide housing, security, food and opportunity to vast swaths of the population: “The idea that everyone needs to work frantically to meet people’s needs is just not true. I do think there’s a problem that we don’t recognize that.” And even if resources were distributed in a way that met the population’s needs, he added, people would still want to work, if only to feel needed and productive. His solution—a bit muddled in the telling—involves somehow recalibrating resources to more evenly serve society, while reducing the number of hours that individual employees work so that everybody can get a job, even a part-time one: “Most people like working, but they’d also like to have more time with their family or to pursue their own interests. So that would be one way to deal with the problem, is if you had a coordinated way to just reduce the workweek. And then, if you add slightly less employment, you can adjust and people will still have jobs.” It’s questionable, of course, whether society would accept the idea of chopping up full-time jobs into itty-bitty ones, just so more people would have something to do, but Page isn’t one for accepting the current paradigm. After all, this is a man who not only helped build the world’s most successful online search engine (and the advertising platform that pays for it), but whose company is now exploring everything from drones and autonomous cars to smartphones that can understand commands spoken in natural language. Sergey Brin, who co-founded Google with Page, is likewise interested in “transformative” movements, whether the self-driving cars that he feels could radically alter how people move from Point A to B, or the high-altitude balloons that could serve the Internet to large segments of the developing world over the next few years. “We try to invest, at least, in the places where we see a good fit to our company,” he told the audience. “But that could be many, many bets, and only a few of them need to pay off.” Brin agrees with page that intelligent machines will gradually replace more and more roles traditionally assigned to humans, and sees that as a good thing. “We do have lots of proof points that one can create intelligent things in the world because—all of us around,” he said. “Therefore, you should presume that someday, we will be able to make machines that can reason, think and do things better than we can.” Some very smart people don’t agree with that rosy assessment of artificial intelligence. In a recent appearance on John Oliver’s HBO show , physicist Stephen Hawking suggested that a sufficiently intelligent robot could prove a “real danger in the not-too-distant future,” enacting plans beyond the will of its human creators. But at least our Robot Overlords might force us to work only 20 hours a week. Related Articles Google Exerting More Control Over Android Ecosystem Google I/O: Android ‘L’ Makes Its Debut Google Glass Tweaks Could Irritate Some Early Adopters Image: Khosla Ventures The post Larry Page Thinks You’ll Only Work Part-Time for Our Robot Overlords appeared first on Dice News .