Tag Archives: federal government

  • The White House’s New Plan for Hiring Tech Pros

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    If you’re a tech pro—or aspire to become one—President Obama wants to find you a job.

    The White House has announced the “TechHire initiative,” which will supposedly fill jobs in everything from software development and network administration to cybersecurity. In order to fill those jobs, the initiative will offer a combination of investment and job placement, with a focus on underserved communities. Here’s the proposal:

    $100 Million in ‘Federal Investments’

    That money will go to training and recruiting workers for in-demand technology fields. “The Administration will launch a $100 million H-1B grant competition by the Department of Labor,” read the White House’s press release, “to support innovative approaches to training and successfully employing low-skill individuals.” That training will include work-based learning programs and registered apprenticeships.

    Community Collaboration

    Some 21 regions across the country will work with one another to recruit and place applicants in some 120,000 open technology jobs, in conjunction with “300 employer partners.” Those regions include:

    Louisville
    New York City
    Philadelphia
    Delaware
    City of Kearney and Buffalo County, Neb.
    Colorado
    St. Louis
    Salt Lake City
    San Antonio
    Los Angeles
    Minneapolis
    Kansas City
    Memphis
    Rural Eastern Kentucky
    Nashville
    Rochester
    Detroit
    San Francisco
    Albuquerque
    Chattanooga
    Portland

    Each region will supposedly use sophisticated data analytics to determine the most in-demand skills among local employers, and work with those employers to hire from “both traditional and nontraditional training programs.” These programs will rely on coding boot camps and online courses to accelerate training, and encourage interactions between employers and candidates via meetups and co-working spaces. In New York City, for example, companies such as Google and Facebook will work to connect students from the City University of New York (CUNY) with internships at local companies.

    Private Sector

    Under the terms of the announced plan, private companies will provide free online training and coding boot camps for low-income and “underserved Americans.” The White House claims that national organizations “are committing to work with interested cities to share job and skills information, job-matching tools, and other resources.” For example, Dev Bootcamp, Hack Reactor, Microsoft, Treehouse Island, and Udacity are all offering free or discounted training for underserved communities.

    However the White House’s initiative pans out, one thing is clear: For those tech pros with the necessary skills, the salaries can be very good indeed. Check out the latest technology jobs.

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    The post The White House’s New Plan for Hiring Tech Pros appeared first on Dice News.

  • Can Boot Camps Really Boost Tech Employment?

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    Earlier this week, the White House unveiled an ambitious plan to train and employ millions of tech pros in 21 regions across the United States.

    Carrying out the plan—dubbed “TechHire”—will depend heavily on coding boot camps and accelerated training programs, which (at least in theory) will make candidates technically proficient in weeks or months rather than years. In addition, a number of big-name tech companies such as Facebook have pledged to take on certain candidates as interns, for on-the-job training.

    Check out the latest technology jobs.

    But can boot camps and online courses transform cities such as Louisville and Minneapolis into burgeoning tech hubs on the level of, say, New York or San Francisco? Regions with robust tech scenes (and equally strong tech-pro hiring) benefit from a number of factors, including close proximity to universities and incubators, low-cost spaces for startups, investment in IT infrastructure such as broadband, and affordable housing.

    There is a growing need for skilled tech talent nationwide, and multiple boot camps have sprung up in order to help meet that demand. Switchup, an organization that collects data on boot camps and programming schools across the nation, recently issued a list of its top 32 coding boot camps. In ranking those institutions, it took into account everything from alumni reviews and instructor quality to location and job support.

    Not everybody believes, however, that boot camps and accelerated courses can quickly fulfill the need for tech talent. “Two months doesn’t prepare you for identifying serious problems and overcoming them,” Jason Polancich, CEO of SurfWatch Labs, told the Wall Street Journal in February.

    Indeed, it can take years of experiences to learn all the quirks, tricks, and procedures that define working within many technology verticals. Some of the tech skills that pay the most—including Hadoop, MapReduce, Platform-as-a-Service software, and Cassandra—are highly specialized, and take quite some time to master.

    So while the administrators behind TechHire may be right in assuming that tech workers don’t necessarily need a four-year degree (or higher) to compete in the space, they should probably realize that growing the country’s reservoir of tech pros isn’t something that can be accomplished in a few months.

    Related Articles

    Upload Your ResumeEmployers want candidates like you. Upload your resume. Show them you’re awesome.

    Image: bikeriderlondon/Shutterstock.com

    The post Can Boot Camps Really Boost Tech Employment? appeared first on Dice News.