Tag Archives: apple

  • Should Mobile Devs Focus Only on iOS?

    Screen Shot 2015-07-13 at 10.55.11 AM

    Financial-news websites are aflutter this week over news that Apple has seized 92 percent of the mobile-device industry’s total operating income; that’s up from 65 percent in 2014. According to financial-services firm Canaccord Genuity, which generated the data, Samsung and Apple pretty much divide the entirety of the mobile world’s profits between them.

    Those estimates are great for Apple, but what does it mean for the mobile developers and app builders out there? First, Apple clearly has quite a bit of momentum behind it; if anyone ever doubted the long-term viability of iOS, numbers like these should settle that issue once and for all.

    Check out the latest iOS-developer jobs.

    Second, the overall picture for third-party operating systems—including Windows Phone and BlackBerry OS—is bleaker than ever; manufacturers won’t build what isn’t profitable, and clearly iOS and Android are the only platforms at the moment capable of generating significant amounts of cash. Any developers who devoted time to building Windows Phone and BlackBerry apps will likely need to think very hard about whether they want to continue iterating on those products.

    But third, Apple and iOS haven’t outright won the mobile-device wars. Although it swept up the vast majority of the profits, Apple sold less than 20 percent of the actual smartphones on the market. Even if most manufacturers aren’t making very much money off Android, there are millions of people using the OS, which means a massive market for app-builders. The idea of building apps for both iOS and Android remains a powerful one for many developers.

    The post Should Mobile Devs Focus Only on iOS? appeared first on Dice Insights.

  • JavaScript Tops Popular Languages, As Swift Rises

    RedMonk

    Developers assume that Swift, Apple’s newish programming language for iOS and Mac OS X apps, will become extremely popular over the next few years. According to new data from RedMonk, a tech-industry analyst firm, Swift could reach that apex of popularity sooner rather than later.

    While the usual stalwarts—including JavaScript, Java, PHP, Python, C#, C++, and Ruby—top RedMonk’s list of the most-used languages, Swift has, well, swiftly ascended 46 spots in the six months since the firm’s last update, from 68th to 22nd.

    Check out the latest developer jobs.

    “When we see dramatic growth from a language it typically has jumped somewhere between 5 and 10 spots, and the closer the language gets to the Top 20 or within it, the more difficult growth is to come by,” RedMonk wrote in an accompanying blog posting. “Given this dramatic ascension, it seems reasonable to expect that the Q3 rankings this year will see Swift as a Top 20 language.”

    RedMonk pulls data from GitHub and Stack Overflow to create its rankings, due to those sites’ respective sizes and the public nature of their data. While its top-ranked languages don’t trade positions much between reports, there’s a fair amount of churn at the lower end of the rankings. Among those “smaller” languages, R has enjoyed stable popularity over the past six months, Rust and Julia continue to climb, and Go has exploded upwards—although CoffeeScript, often sited as a language to watch, has seen its support crumble a bit.

    Here are RedMonk’s top 20 languages:

    1. JavaScript
    2. Java
    3. PHP
    4. Python
    5. C#
    5. C++
    5. Ruby
    8. CSS
    9. C
    10. Objective-C
    11. Perl
    11. Shell
    13. R
    14. Scala
    15. Haskell
    16. MATLAB
    17. Go
    17. Visual Basic
    19. Clojure
    19. Groovy

    A more intensive look at RedMonk’s data is available on its blog.

    Upload Your ResumeEmployers want candidates like you. Upload your resume. Show them you’re awesome.

    Related Articles

    Image: RedMonk

    The post JavaScript Tops Popular Languages, As Swift Rises appeared first on Dice News.

  • Amazon’s Echo Enters Digital-Assistant Fight

    Amazon Echo

    Imagine a device in your home that passively listens to everything you say. In past decades, you might have called such a device a “bug,” and it was probably installed without your knowledge.

    But in the brave new world of 2014, this device is called Amazon Echo, and it’s apparently here to help.

    Click here to find mobile-development jobs.

    Echo is a black cylinder that can go pretty much anywhere in a house or apartment, and responds to a variety of queries. You can ask it about the weather, or a trivia question, and receive a reply; you can tell it to add items to a shopping list, and it does so; you can order it to play music, which the built-in speaker will blast at appropriate volume. The device is plugged in; an accompanying app for smartphones will allow users to manage shopping lists, music, alarms, and more through a specialized dashboard.

    “Echo’s brain is in the cloud, running on Amazon Web Services so it continually learns and adds more functionality over time,” reads Amazon’s copy on the product. “The more you use Echo, the more it adapts to your speech patterns, vocabulary, and personal preferences.”

    The consumer-tech world has been down this road before, of course. Apple’s Siri digital assistant responds to vocal commands; Google Now will answer spoken queries. The companies building these cloud-based, voice-activated platforms claim the software becomes more sophisticated as users make more queries. But voice has yet to catch on as a default means of input. In late 2013, for example, one poll suggested that 85 percent of those who owned an iOS device had never used Siri.

    Upload Your ResumeEmployers want candidates like you. Upload your resume. Show them you’re awesome.

    For Amazon fans and customers, the appearance of Echo on the heels of the Fire Phone’s high-profile failure might lead to concerns that the company is spreading itself too thin. Amazon dominates the online-retail market, and Amazon Web Services (AWS) powers many a company’s cloud, but that’s evidently not enough for CEO Jeff Bezos: He seems to want to rule the device market, as well. But while Amazon’s Kindle e-readers and Fire tablets drew users, Amazon had to take a massive write-down on the Fire Phone.

    Echo isn’t a bet-the-company initiative, but if it fails to gain marketplace traction, it could increase the calls for Amazon to focus on what it does best.

    Related Articles

    Image: Amazon

    The post Amazon’s Echo Enters Digital-Assistant Fight appeared first on Dice News.

  • Certifications With the Highest Demand

    shutterstock_pepgooner

    For years, cynical IT pros have maintained that certifications aren’t worth the paper they’re printed on. But recruiters and analysts report a growing interest in IT certification. While it’s true that employers still want to see experience, certification can provide outside validation of your skills… and signal a commitment to furthering those skills.

    Certifications in these areas are showing some of the sharpest growth in demand:

    Security

    The recent breaches at Target, Home Depot and the almost-daily privacy and security lapses at healthcare institutions are making security a hot area for IT pros.

    Fortune 1000 companies are now spending millions of dollars on their privacy programs, with financial services, consumer products, and retail firms leading the way, according to a survey by the International Association of Privacy Professionals (IAPP). A third of the responding companies said they plan to increase their privacy program staff, while only 3 percent expect to cut staffers.

    Upload Your ResumeEmployers want candidates like you. Upload your resume. Show them you’re awesome.

    That’s why certifications such as GIAC Certified Penetration Tester, InfoSys Security Management Professional (ISSMP/CISSP), and EC-Council Certified Ethical Hacker are among the fastest-growing with regard to premium pay, according to analyst firm Foote Partners.

    In addition, government jobs these days often require security certifications for contractors as well as staff positions.

    Mobility and Cloud

    In its predictions for 2015, Juniper Research maintains that mobile and cloud will alter the architectural landscape, and that DevOps techniques will revamp the way we deliver solutions to business stakeholders. Perhaps the biggest challenge facing companies, however, will be recruiting and retaining people will the skills to build applications quickly and to integrate them into legacy portfolios.

    Cloud employers are looking for pros skilled in Linux, Java/J2EE, SaaS (Software-as-a-Service), Python, virtualization, and other areas, according to a recent analysis of the Dice database.

    Amazon Web Services recently unveiled a new DevOps Engineer certification, which validates the technical expertise required for provisioning, operating and managing distributed application systems on its public-cloud platform. (It’s still in beta through mid-December.) To be eligible, you must already be certified as an AWS Certified Developer – Associate or AWS Certified SysOps Administrator – Associate.

    Linux

    A new Gartner report cites a shift to open-source software as a major factor in the coming major disruption to data centers. IT leaders responding to a survey by TechPro Research put more faith in the future of Linux desktops than in the possibility of Apple elbowing ahead of Microsoft in the enterprise.

    Combine that with Microsoft open-sourcing its .NET code to run atop Linux servers, along with the wild popularity of container technology such as Docker, and the future of Linux seems bright.

    Linux Professional Institute certifications, CompTIA Linux+ and RedHat Certified Technician are among the skills making big gains in market value of late.

    While the ranks of Linux pros is growing, the segment isn’t expanding fast enough to meet demand, said Jim Zemlin, executive director of the Linux Foundation, in announcing two new vendor-neutral certifications: the Linux Foundation Certified System Administrator (LFCS), which covers the skills necessary for basic-to-intermediate system administration from the command-line for systems running Linux, and the Linux Foundation Certified Engineer (LFCE), which focuses on the design and implementation of system architecture. Both are performance-based and can be on CentOS, openSUSE, or Ubuntu.

    Related Articles

    Image: Pepgooner/Shutterstock.com

    The post Certifications With the Highest Demand appeared first on Dice News.

  • Apple Could Debut New iPads Oct. 16

    Apple iPad Mini

    Hot on the heels of last month’s debut of two new iPhones, Apple plans on unveiling something new at an Oct. 16 press conference.

    In typical fashion, Apple is keeping the details of its announcements under wraps, but the general consensus is that the company will roll out at least one new iPad, and possibly announce that Mac OS X “Yosemite” is available for download.

    Click here to find iOS developer jobs.

    Tech publications such as The Verge seem to uniformly believe that the next iPad is the iPad Air 2, and will include an upgraded processor (the A8X) along with the Touch ID fingerprint sensor already available in later-generation iPhones. This new iPad could boast an anti-reflective coating, which would render content easier to read in bright sunlight; just like the newer iPhones, it might also come with the option of a gold casing in addition to gray and silver.

    Assumptions about processor upgrades and color options seem pretty safe, as Apple hasn’t really altered the iPad’s design since the tablet’s introduction, aside from making the body thinner and lighter, and the screen higher-resolution.

    The rumor mill seems less clear on whether Apple will introduce a next-generation iPad mini to go along with a new full-size iPad, but considering how it’s been a year since the last iPad mini made its debut, such a move seems logical. (As any Apple watcher knows, the company likes to stick to yearly upgrades for many of its core products.) A new iPad mini would also presumably feature a more powerful processor and other upgraded internals.

    Upload Your ResumeEmployers want candidates like you. Upload your resume. Show them you’re awesome.

    Speaking of yearly upgrades, it’s a near-certainty that Apple will use its event to announce the release date of Mac OS X “Yosemite,” the latest upgrade of its desktop operating system. New features include the ability to take iPhone calls on a Mac, “hand off” documents between desktops and iOS devices, and a streamlined version of Apple’s Safari browser.

    But will Apple also debut new MacBooks, or even a new iPod? The answer to that will likely remain murky until Oct. 16.

    Related Articles

    Image: Apple

    The post Apple Could Debut New iPads Oct. 16 appeared first on Dice News.